Archive for the ‘APA’ Category

APA Top Margin

APA Style margins are 1″ all the way around. Students often ask about the top margin, why isn’t the running head one inch from the edge of the paper? The APA manual never describes where the running head, which is a document header, should be placed in relation to the top margin so it is no wonder that people ask this question.

A header, by definition, is inside of the margin. The body of the paper starts one inch down from the top edge of the document but the APA running head is inside of that space between the body of the APA Style document and the top edge of the document.

The APA Style running head is inside of the top margin

Top APA Margin with Running Head inside of Margin

 

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Cite a sound recording in APA style

The worldΓÇÖs largest natural sound archive is now fully digital and fully online. Example: http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/42327

Citing a sound recording in APA style is easy with Reference Point Software. Just click on the APA tab and click Audio Podcast.

Cite a sound recording in APA style

Cite a sound recording in APA Style (Click image to view larger)

 

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Best APA style software and APA help

I LOVE the software! It saved me hours and hours of work, not to mention the hassle and frustration. I would never have imagined an APA paper being so easy to write and format!!! I’ve recommended it to all my classmates. Well done! Thank you so much for creating it and sharing it with us all!
Tracey S., Northern Arizona University

Hey guys….
I purchased your software as an attempt to get some help navigating the APA formats this morning. I was BLOWN away at how easy it was to use, and the results were amazing!

Ty Permenter, University of Texas

With just a few clicks of the mouse, your document will have the proper margins, with the header and page numbers at exactly the right place for any APA format style paper. Even references and citations are a breeze. Simply type in the information, and the software will format it perfectly.

To learn more scroll down to see the list of features or:

You need to use APA format templates that allow you to concentrate on the content of your paper so that you can learn about the topic rather than word processing commands and our software does just that. Save time and work smarter with our Reference Point Software. Our templates are available in APA style for use with Microsoft Word, Microsoft Office 365, OpenOffice, LibreOffice and NeoOffice on any version of Windows or OS X.

These templates are based on the 6th Edition of the APA Publication Manual and include support for APA format style guidelines for electronic resources and references.

Get the APA style points you deserve with Reference Point Software templates. Order now!

(Mobile users, please use the menu on the upper right of your screen to order.)

What Does the APA version of our Format Template Do?

  • Sets up a new document in APA 6th edition format, within which you can start typing your paper
  • Automatically formats the reference list and makes inserting citations a breeze
  • Easily reuse references in multiple documents with the built-in database
  • Creates the header with page numbers and running head
  • Sets up the proper margins, line spacing, and other vital details
  • Creates a title page
  • Creates an abstract page, a place for the body of the paper, and reference page
  • Easily add properly formatted headings and subheadings
  • Formats each reference with commas, parentheses, italics, and indents in exactly the right spots
  • Makes it seamless to cite a reference in the body of the paper, even when citing multiple sources at once
  • Creates complex page numbering (MS Word only)
  • Provides sample tables that you can modify for your own needs (MS Word for Windows only)
  • Provides an APA format template to easily create an outline (MS Word only)
  • With Reference Point templates, your citation info travels with your document. If you work on more than one computer, you only need to copy one file to the other computer ΓÇô your APA document!
  • You have complete control over where the reference database is stored. This makes it easy to sync multiple computers with Dropbox or other file-syncing services.
  • Quickly and efficiently backs up your document automatically and on-demand (MS Word for Windows only)
  • Compatible with Win XP, Vista, Win 7, Win 8, and OS X (see order page for specifics)

Need an APA Format Template? We support both Windows & Mac

If you have any questions about APA Format Styles or our software, Reference Point Software is here to help you.

Learn more about the different versions of our templates

Our Word menu to help you format apa style

Our Word menu to help you format APA style

 

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Citing an Executive Order in APA Style

Citing an executive order in APA Style is easy using Reference Point Software, however, collecting the information you need for the citation can be challenging. This article will describe how to find the information you need to cite an executive order.

Start with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Suppose you want to cite executive order number 13649 “Accelerating Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care.” Visit the U.S. Government Publishing OfficeΓÇÖs online CFR which you can find here:
http://www.gpo.gov/example

Select the correct year to get a list of executive orders. For this example, the year is 2014 is selected.

Searching the Code of Federal Regulations

Searching the Code of Federal Regulations

Use your browserΓÇÖs Find feature (usually accessed by hitting Ctrl-F) and search for HIV.

Executive order found in CFR

Executive order found in CFR

Open the PDF. Make note of the name of the executive order, the order number, the year, and the page number. In the below example ΓÇ£317ΓÇ¥ is the page number. ΓÇ£13649ΓÇ¥ is the executive order number.

Find the items to cite for an executive order

Executive order displayed in the CFR

If the executive order is documented in the United States Code (U.S.C.) then you should include volume, section, page, and year from the U.S.C. In this example “300cc-1” is the section, 78 is the volume, and 43057 is the page.

Executive order in the U.S.C

Executive order in the U.S.C

The last step is to enter the information into Reference Point Software’s data entry screen for executive orders. You will then get a perfectly formatted APA Style reference. To enter a reference to an executive order click on the APA tab, click More, click Executive Order.

 

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Cite an NIH publication in APA Style

Our template for APA style makes it easy to cite an NIH document. Many users think these should be cited as web pages but these types of documents are actually technical reports in ΓÇ£APAΓÇ¥ terminology. Take a look at this document as an example:

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/files/docs/pht_facts.pdf

NIH publication example

NIH publication example


If you scroll to the bottom of the document you will see that the document has a publication number. You should cite this document by its NIH publication number rather than the web address.

NIH publication report number

NIH publication report number


To cite this document in Word click APA, More, Technical Report and enter the publication info in the Report ID field.

Citing an NIH document using Reference Point Software

Citing an NIH publication in Reference Point Software

Hint: use Ctrl-V to paste the report information into the entry form.

David Plaut, MS is the founder of Reference Point Software (RPS). RPS offers a complete suite of easy-to-use formatting template products featuring MLA and APA style templates, freeing up time to focus on substance while ensuring formatting accuracy. 

 

For more information about MLA or APA writing templates, contact us by email

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How to Apply Critical Thinking and Logic in Argumentative Essays

Whatever subject youΓÇÖre studying in college, your professors are likely to ask you to write an argumentative essay, also referred to as a persuasive essay. Critical thinking is essential for writing academic papers, particularly when writing an essay that requires you to demonstrate that one idea is better and more legitimate than other ideas. Of course, when we refer to critical thinking we donΓÇÖt mean criticizing from emotion or prejudice, but using logic to analyze and argue your case to support your position.

The Definition of Logic

When youΓÇÖre tasked with writing an argumentative essay, youΓÇÖre expected to use logic and reason. This is the basis and foundation of critical thinking. But how is logic defined? The Greek philosopher Aristotle developed the most common formula for logic, called a syllogism. It is as follows:

Premise 1: All men are mortal.
Premise 2: Socrates is a man.
Conclusion: Socrates is mortal.

The first statement is a foundation of fact and the second statement is another fact. When the second statement is tested against the first statement, it proves the conclusion in the third statement. You may use more than two premises to prove your conclusion. When you have your logical premises and conclusion, the conclusion becomes the thesis of your argument, and the premises become the supporting points. If your argument doesnΓÇÖt work using this concept, it isnΓÇÖt considered logical and, therefore, isnΓÇÖt considered proven.

Logic can be misleading if part of it is based on a fallacy. This is an example of how a logical statement can appear accurate but is actually completely false even though the syllogism is logically true.

Premise 1: People who wear yellow are bad drivers
Premise 2: John wears a yellow shirt
Conclusion: John is a bad driver

For a syllogism to work, you must make sure your facts are facts and not assumptions or some other form of fallacy.

When youΓÇÖre writing your argumentative essay, be careful to avoid the use of illogical statements and fallacies, such as:

  • Hasty Generalization: when an incorrect conclusion is reached through a limited number of premises
  • Circular Argument: when an argument is just restated rather than proven
  • Ad Hominem: when the writer attacks the person rather than the facts
  • Ad Populum: when the writer appeals to the readerΓÇÖs emotions rather than using facts
  • Red Herring: when a writer makes the reader pay attention to something other than the facts
  • Either/Or: when the writer oversimplifies the argument by reducing it to only two sides or choices

Additionally, your argumentative essay should also avoid the use of emotional and colloquial language.

To produce evidence to support your argument, you will need to gather your facts carefully. DonΓÇÖt make the mistake of confusing facts with so-called truths, which are ideas believed by people, but not proven. Instead, you should always use sound reasoning and solid evidence by stating facts, giving logical reasons, using examples and statistics, and quoting experts and utilizing any other provable resources.

Be sure that you cite your sources carefully using the correct formatting style. This will enable your reader to check the sources behind your assertions. Your professor will indicate which formatting style you should use for your argumentative essay. If you are not assigned a formatting style and you are unsure which one to use, consult your professor.

David Plaut is the founder of Reference Point Software (RPS). RPS offers a complete suite of easy-to-use formatting template products featuring MLA and APA style templates, freeing up time to focus on substance while ensuring formatting accuracy. 

Reference Point Software is not associated with, endorsed by, or affiliated with the American Psychological Association (APA) or with the Modern Language Association (MLA).

 

For more information about MLA or APA writing templates, contact us by email

How to Paraphrase and Use the Correct Citation Styles to Avoid Plagiarism

While youΓÇÖre at college, you will be required to write numerous essays to demonstrate your understanding of a subject and your ability to conduct effective research. A large proportion of your research will be done by examining and disseminating other peopleΓÇÖs work to provide information that supports your thesis.

You may wish to paraphrase some of your findings or give a direct quote that supports your ideas. While it is never a good idea to borrow other peopleΓÇÖs work without giving credit where it is due, in academia, it is the ultimate sin. Using other peopleΓÇÖs work without giving proper credit can not only result in your work losing credibility but can also lead to other, more severe consequences. This article describes how to paraphrase your source material by re-shaping other peopleΓÇÖs ideas in your essays, and how to give credit to the author correctly should you want to borrow passages of their work.

How to Paraphrase without Plagiarism

The art of good paraphrasing is accomplished by knowing what to take from a passage and what to leave out. Your aim is to convey the information without copying the structure or word sequences. To do this, read the work over to get the full sense of it. Then, make a list of the essential ideas and their connections to the points you are making. Note any important keywords. Add to this list any important names used in the passage and their relevance. Make notes of any impressions and thoughts as they arise. Then write a passage using the information and your notes without referring to the original work.

When you have done this, read it through and compare it with your source material. It should clearly convey the sense of what you have sourced without looking like you have simply moved a few words or phrases around.

Example:

We will use a passage from another of our articles, ΓÇ£A vs. An before an abbreviation,ΓÇ¥ as an example of paraphrasing. The original passage reads:

ΓÇ£We all learned that you use an ΓÇ£aΓÇ¥ before words that start with consonants and ΓÇ£anΓÇ¥ before words that start with vowels. But what about abbreviations? Should you use an ΓÇ£aΓÇ¥ or an ΓÇ£anΓÇ¥ before abbreviations?ΓÇ¥

“The accepted rule is to use the choice that matches how the abbreviation is pronounced rather than how it is spelled. For example, HIV begins with a consonant but is pronounced āch-ˌī-ˈvē. In other words, HIV is pronounced as starting with a long “a,” which is a vowel; therefore, it should be proceeded by “an.” The following sentence illustrates the correct usage: An HIV positive patient was transferred to the nursing unit.”

Edited version:

At school, we were taught the rules about using ΓÇÿaΓÇÖ and ΓÇÿanΓÇÖ before vowels, consonants, the silent ΓÇÿhΓÇÖ, phonetic glides, and when a consonant sounds like a vowel. However, many people struggle when it comes to using these indefinite articles correctly before abbreviations.

The rules for abbreviations are based on their phonetics and, therefore, they have their own logic. For example, HIV is pronounced ─üch – ─½ – v─ô, so the correct usage would look like this:

An HIV test is recommended for all pregnant women to determine if medication is required to prevent the spread of the virus to the unborn child.

Using the Correct Citation Styles

At some point during your essay, it may be appropriate to quote directly from your research materials as an additional way to strengthen your argument. If you are going to use a direct quote from someone elseΓÇÖs work, then you must document your sources carefully so you can correctly cite your references. The most commonly used methods of citations are MLA and APA formatting. These use in-text citations, placed in the same sentences or paragraphs with the quotes.

It is very important to ensure that you use the most up to date methods of MLA and APA formatting styles as these are revised from time to time. You can either format your citations manually, or you may prefer to use MLA and APA APA formatting software which will save you significant time and ensure that you are using the correct version. With a couple of clicks of your mouse, your citation formatting will be done for you, leaving you more time to spend compiling your research and writing your essay.

David Plaut is the founder of Reference Point Software (RPS). RPS offers a complete suite of easy-to-use formatting template products featuring MLA and APA style templates, freeing up time to focus on substance while ensuring formatting accuracy. 

Reference Point Software is not associated with, endorsed by, or affiliated with the American Psychological Association (APA) or with the Modern Language Association (MLA).

 

For more information about MLA or APA writing templates, contact us by email

How to Write an Expository Paper

Professors like to assign an expository paper because itΓÇÖs a good way to challenge students on how to perform in-depth research and demonstrate their understanding of a specific topic. ItΓÇÖs likely that you will be required to write this type of paper at least once, if not several times while youΓÇÖre in school. Here is an overview of what an expository paper is and the key elements necessary so you can write a paper that meets your professorsΓÇÖ expectations.

The Definition

The word ΓÇ£expositoryΓÇ¥ is based on the word ΓÇ£expoundΓÇ¥ which means to ΓÇ£clarify the meaning of and discourse in a learned way, usually in writing.ΓÇ¥

An expository paper explains by exposing and conveying information about something that may be difficult to understand. It informs by giving a complete, fair, interesting and relevant explanation about a topic in detail. It does not use criticism, argument or any form of development of the subject. It simply demonstrates all the relevant facts without giving any point of view from the writer. The first person, ΓÇ£IΓÇ¥, is not used in an expository paper.

Getting Started

The steps to writing this paper are similar to writing any other winning term paper. You must first define your audience. Who are you addressing? Why do they need to know this information? What information is relevant to them? When you have identified the answers to these questions, you can go on to do your research.

Find a credible source that clearly states the facts. Make sure you understand the ideas and underlying values contained in the work that underpin the writerΓÇÖs thesis. Then go on to use the work of other equivalent sources to put the ideas into a larger context.

When you write your paper, make sure you communicate your explanation clearly, analyzing the parts fully in proper sequence so your audience follows how you arrived at your conclusions.

The Basic Structure

There are different developmental styles you can choose from for writing expository papers that each has its own pattern, depending on the subject matter. They should all start with an introductory paragraph and your thesis statement. The rest of your paper should follow the pattern for the style of expository paper that you are writing.

The patterns include:

Description ΓÇô Describe your topic by listing characteristics, features and examples, using cue words such as ΓÇ£likeΓÇ¥ and ΓÇ£such asΓÇ¥, for example.

Sequence ΓÇô List items and events in numerical or chronological order. Use cue words such as ΓÇ£firstΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£secondΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£thirdΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£nextΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£thenΓÇ¥, and ΓÇ£finallyΓÇ¥.

Comparison ΓÇô Explain how two things are alike or different using cue words such as ΓÇ£alikeΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£same asΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£on the other handΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£differentΓÇ¥, and ΓÇ£in contrastΓÇ¥.

Cause and Effect ΓÇô List one or more causes and resulting effect or effects, using cue words such as ΓÇ£a resultΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£thereforeΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£becauseΓÇ¥, and ΓÇ£reasons whyΓÇ¥.

Problem and Solution ΓÇô State a problem and list one or more solutions to the problem or pose a question and then give answers to it. Cue words for this pattern include ΓÇ£problem isΓÇ¥, ΓÇ£dilemma isΓÇ¥, and ΓÇ£puzzle is solvedΓÇ¥.

Finally, your concluding paragraph should reflect back to your opening paragraph and reinforce your thesis statement.

Proper Formatting

As you explain your topic, you will cite references from other works to provide a complete argument. Be sure to cite your sources accurately using the most up to date version of the APA or MLA formatting guidelines. This will help your readers refer to the sources you provide. If your professor specifically assigns MLA formatting for your paper, you will need to follow the guidelines for creating a bibliography, too. If you do not adhere to these guidelines, you will make it difficult for your readers to verify your supporting evidence, which will cost you points.

David Plaut is the founder of Reference Point Software (RPS). RPS offers a complete suite of easy-to-use formatting template products featuring MLA and APA style templates, freeing up time to focus on substance while ensuring formatting accuracy. For more information, log onto http://www.referencepointsoftware.com/ or write to us here.

Reference Point Software is not associated with, endorsed by, or affiliated with the American Psychological Association (APA) or with the Modern Language Association (MLA).

Why APA Formatted Papers Have Different Levels of Headings and Subheadings

The proper usage of headings and subheadings in APA Formatted Papers can seem mysterious to most college writers. What headings are necessary? When should you use subheadings? How do you properly format them so you donΓÇÖt lose points on your paper?

In simplistic terms, think of your headings and subheadings as a visual roadmap helping you to organize your paper for your readers while giving them a succinct understanding of what information you will be sharing in each section. Your professor will inform you which of these categories you need to include in your paper.

  • Title Page
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Method
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • References and Appendices

The Title Page of an APA formatted paper is normally considered the first page. The title of your paper does not count as a level. The second page of an APA paper will be the one to contain the “Abstract.” Since the Abstract is a summary, you should limit it to just one paragraph of about 150 to 250 words without any subheadings, whereas other sections of your paper will require them.

You can create up to five levels of headings and subheadings. Many APA Formatted Papers contain only one or two levels, while other more in-depth papers will need all five. The APA style will require you to format these in a specific way to clearly illustrate their increasing levels of specificity for your readers.

Here are some general rules for creating effecting headings and subheadings.

Headings
Keep your headings short. Most are one to five words that provide a strong indication of the information in the section. Only use a heading if you have more than one heading for the level. Think of it this way, you wouldnΓÇÖt create a bulleted list of one item. The same holds true for headers in your APA Formatted Papers.

Subheadings
Subheadings are often a little longer than headings because they are more descriptive and expand upon the heading. Think of your subheadings as a reference for readers to skim through your papers to get a quick understanding of what information you will be sharing with them and how you will transition from your Abstract through to your Conclusion. If you are including a subheading to a section, APA formatted papers require you to have two subheadings on the same level.

Some other general tips for you to consider are, donΓÇÖt overdo the use of headings and subheadings. Not every paragraph needs them. They are intended to enhance the content in your paper, not detract from it. It is often best to write the content of your paper first, and then add in concise headings and subheadings where appropriate.

Before you get started with the formatting of your paper, you will need to research the latest APA style revision to make sure you donΓÇÖt lose points for formatting errors. If you prefer to focus your time wisely on the quality of your content and not the formatting parameters, you’ll be happy to know there are many resources available. Formatting software is one reliable, helpful tool to consider for saving time while taking the guesswork out of formatting your APA style papers.

 

For more information about APA writing software or how to download our APA Style Software, contact us today!

 

David Plaut is the founder of Reference Point Software (RPS). RPS offers a complete suite of easy-to-use formatting template products featuring MLA and APA style templates, freeing up time to focus on substance while ensuring formatting accuracy. For more information, log onto http://www.referencepointsoftware.com/ or write to:
info @ referencepointsoftware.com

Reference Point Software is not associated with, endorsed by, or affiliated with the American Psychological Association (APA) or with the Modern Language Association (MLA).

What Is the MLA Style Format?

With various formatting styles for writing a college paper, and switching between formatting styles for your different courses, itΓÇÖs easy to get confused about what the proper MLA style format guidelines you should apply actually are.

The MLA style format is one of a number of documentation and formatting styles that are used in writing scholastic papers. The majority of academic and research fields agree that every quote, reference and borrowed material within a scholarly paper should be credited to the source. However, documentation styles and conventions vary due to the different needs of the wide variety of different scholarly disciplines.

The MLA style format is generally quite a bit simpler, more straightforward and more concise than most of the other documentation styles. A hallmark feature of the MLA style is the usage of the parenthetical citation, which is linked up with an entry on an alphabetical list at the end of the paper. (This list of references is called the “Works Cited” page.)

“MLA” stands for the Modern Language Association of America. This is a long-standing, highly reputable organization in existence since 1883. The MLA style format is primarily used within the humanities, and in particular for papers on the topics of literature and language arts.

The MLA style has been widely utilized by many schools, universities, academic departments, professors and instructors for the past fifty or more years. MLA guidelines are also used by more than 1,100 scholarly and literary journals, academic newsletters and magazines. The MLA style format is also the favored formatting style used by numerous university and commercial presses. The Modern Language Association of America’s guidelines is implemented all throughout the continent of North America as well as other countries such as Brazil, China, India, Japan, and Taiwan.

The main considerations of formatting a paper in MLA style are as follows:

  • Document settings should employ 1-inch margins. The written content should be double-spaced using 12-point type.
  • There should be a Page Header on the upper right corner of every page. The Page Header should include the author’s name and the correct page number.
  • Include a Title Block on the first page, which should be comprised of the assignment information as well as an informative and creative title.
  • The paper should include Citations wherever applicable, crediting the sources used directly in the paper. Each Citation should be placed in the sentence near the idea you are paraphrasing or quoting or at the end of the sentence, with no comma between the author and page number. Also, the punctuation following (comma or period) belongs outside of the closing parentheses.
  • The paper should include a Works Cited list at the end, sorted alphabetically by author. (If the author is not known, sort by publisher, or if necessary, by title.) Each listing should include the author (or other identifier) with the last name, comma, then first name followed by a period. List the title in quotes, period. The publisher, publication city and year should follow the title.
  • Optionally include a Bibliography page after the Works Cited list. Format the Bibliography like the Works Cited list — alphabetically (as opposed to in the order of items cited.) The Bibliography should include ALL works used to create the paper, even if not cited directly in the paper.

Following the MLA style can feel tedious at times. Fortunately, our formatting software is available. This is a great option for those who want to streamline the paper-writing process and be able to rest assured that they are formatting their papers correctly.

David Plaut is the founder of Reference Point Software (RPS). RPS offers a complete suite of easy-to-use formatting template products featuring MLA and APA style templates, freeing up time to focus on substance while ensuring formatting accuracy. For more information, log onto http://www.referencepointsoftware.com/ or write to:
info @ referencepointsoftware.com

Reference Point Software is not associated with, endorsed by, or affiliated with the American Psychological Association (APA) or with the Modern Language Association (MLA).